Cucumber Kimchi Noodles

Slofoodgroup Team September 02, 2020

Cold Noodles with Homemade Cucumber Kimchi

This cold noodle dish is inspired by a variety of ingredients often used in Korean cooking. In kimchi-making, sea salt is essential. Traditional kimchi is made with Napa cabbage, but we swapped it out with cucumbers for rendetion of the Korean classic. We think it's just as delicious and a nice variation.

Another ingredient commonly found in Korean dishes is gochugaru paste, it's a spicy paste made from Korean red chili flakes. In a pinch, cayenne pepper can be substituted, but try to find the real thing for the best results.

Have fun making the recipe and don’t be afraid to double or triple the kimchi recipe to store for later!

*Note: While this recipe is incredibly easy to make and has very little active time, the kimchi will need to ferment for 12 hours, so plan in advance. 

How to make this cold, Korean noodle dish and cucumber kimchi

Serves: 2

Prep Time: 10‘

Cooking Time: 5’

Additional Time: 12h

 

Ingredients

For the cucumber kimchi:

  • 4 cornichons, fresh, cut in chunks
  • 1 tsp flaky sea salt
  • ¼ apple, thinly sliced
  • ½ carrot, julienne
  • 2 spring onions
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 2 cloves of garlic, grated
  • Thumb size ginger, grated
  • 1 tbsp gochugaru paste
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce

For the noodles:

  • Handful of dried rice noodles or soba noodles
  • ½ cup cucumber kimchi (or more, to taste)
  • 1 medium garlic clove, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 thumb thinly sliced ginger
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce

Toppings:

  • Thinly sliced radishes
  • Chilies
  • Fresh coriander
  • Sesame seeds
  • Boiled eggs or tofu

Method of Preparation

  1. Start with the cucumber kimchi; add the flaky sea salt to the chopped cucumbers and allow to draw moisture for 10-15 minutes;
  2. In the meanwhile, mix the sugar, ginger, garlic, gochugaru paste, soy sauce, and fish sauce to a small bowl and set aside; this will be the kimchi paste;
  3. Drain the juices from the cucumbers; add the onion, sliced apple, and carrot and give it a mix; add the already made kimchi paste and massage everything really well; cover and allow to ferment at room temperature for 12h; add to a jar and store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week;
  4. Cook the noodles according to the package’s instructions; drain and allow to cool completely;
  5. While they cool down, make the sauce by combining the garlic clove, ginger, vinegar sesame oil, lime juice, soy sauce, sugar and fish sauce;
  6. Once the noodles are cold, mix the sauce until it coats evenly; add the cucumber kimchi and give it another stir;
  7. Serve with desired toppings.

You can find our full library of unique recipes and learn about ingredients from around the world on our blog.





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